These enhancements incorporate some of the new NGSS standards were developed and tested by several teams of 3rd grade teachers over the course of the 2014-2015 school year as part of a grant through OSPI. At the end of year as a larger team we merged changed lessons into this document. In entirety, these enhanced lessons present substantial changes to the Seattle Public School’s Rocks and Minerals Instructional Guide and the teacher’s manual which comes with the kit. These enhancements/changes can be done in entirety or independently. For example, one could chose to do the engineering piece in Lesson 15 – “Develop a Multi-tool” without doing the changes to the mineral guide in Lesson 6. Or, for example you could chose to do the Engineering enhancement to the mineral guide in Lesson 6, and the change to the Mystery Minerals in Lesson 16 without doing Lesson 15.
Rocks & Minerals Unit Summary
Lesson #
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhModifications/Noteshhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Duration
(50-60 minute lessons)
1
No Change
2
2
No Change
1-2
3 & 3B
Exit Ticket - CER enhancement

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson3B_CER_ExitTicket>
3-4
4
No Change
1
5
No Change
1
5A
Field Guide - Engineering Enhancement

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson5A_Eng_FieldGuide>
2
Overview of Changes: The lessons for the rest of this unit are presented in a different order. The readings are spread throughout the lessons, and students are tasked with identifying a couple of minerals after each test. They must support their claims with evidence and come to consensus as a class. Finally, once a mineral is identified, they write it in their field guide and we should refer to that mineral by its name from then on. Some minerals cannot be identified immediately – these will be tracked on a classroom chart and revisited after each test to see if they can be identified.
6
Do NOT do Lesson 6 as written in IG (Field Guide Enhancement (5A) is replacement)

Add "odor test" from Lesson #10

While students are creating their field guide (focusing on illustrations, observable properties, color, texture, etc.) they should also be examining odor.

Follow Discuss/Identify Process with sulfur.

4
7
Change “describe color of mineral” to the “color of the streak of each mineral.” (This differentiates it from the observable color that they recorded in Lesson 6).

After they have done the streak test, go through the Discuss/Identify Process with graphite and galena.
1
11
Magnetism - CER Enhancement

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson11_CER_Magnetism>

After the magnetism test, go through the Discuss/Identify Process for magnetite and hematite. This is a good opportunity to have students use two tests to help with identification (hematite is sometimes magnetic, and often has a reddish streak, magnetite is always magnetic…)
1
8
After the light test, use the Discuss/Identify Process for fluorite and muscovite.
2
9
After the luster test, use the Discuss/Identify Process for talc and calcite.
1
10
After the hardness test, go through the Discuss/Identify Process for gypsum and feldspar. Both the hardness test and light tests are necessary for identifying gypsum and feldspar (it’s how they are different from each other).
1
12/13
Clarification – when discussing the shape of minerals, crystal is what is used to describe shape (crystal shape or not a crystal shape). Otherwise, it’s cleavage (how minerals break when struck with a hammer). The point of this activity is to for kids to identify some final unique qualities to help with mineral identification. Have students compare samples to determine if minerals seem to have a special shape (crystal, flat, cube, etc.) or if they have no special shape. This information should be recorded in the “observable properties” section of their field guide.

Rationale: This helps set apart the minerals that have a clear special shape (muscovite, quartz, calcite) from those that are amorphous.

After students have recorded shape, use the Discuss/Identify Process for quartz and diamonds.

Suggestion for how to combine/replace lessons 12 and 13:

1) Discuss the difference between observable shape, shape as used by geologists (crystal), and cleavage.

2) separate the minerals from the egg cartons and put them onto trays of the same sample (so one tray has all of mineral A on it, another all of B, and so on). Give each group a chance (5 mins or so) to observe each sample set and figure out if that group of minerals has a special shape, or if they are amorphous. This is also a good chance to have them make any additional observations about what makes that particular mineral unique.

(Recommendation: have student volunteers create these sample trays and put the minerals back in the egg cartons when finished…)
2
14
Students should have identified all of the minerals at this point. If not, go through the list of “unidentified minerals” and use the Discuss/Identify Process for them (galena and diamond won’t have mineral samples…)

Students will choose a mineral and write a CER that justifies why they know that mineral is that mineral based on the information from their field guides.

Unique Properties - CER Enhancement*

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson14_CER_Unique Properties>
1-2
15
Design a Multi-tool - Engineering Enhancement

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson15_Eng_DesignAMulti-tool>
4
16
Mystery Minerals - CER Enhancement

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson16_CER_MysteryMinerals>
2
16A*
Communicate what was learned - Engineering Enhancement*

<Rocks_Gr3_Lesson16A_Eng_CommunicateWhatWasLearned>
5
*Optional

Rationale: The field guide tests are set up as inquiry but students end the unit with an incomplete conceptual understanding of the various minerals. Instead, let’s focus on the creation of a field guide (which naturally relies on the work of other scientists) and build a conceptual understanding of the minerals. Students will get a chance to make claims and arguments throughout the tests rather than just at the end. Finally, students use the field guide they created to identify the new minerals in lesson 15, so the inquiry is still there but with greater meaning and application.

Group Members: Cindy Adams, Kimberly Adsit, Cathy Alward, Daniel Barkley, Lisa Boveng, Heather Christothoulou, Paula Eisenrich, Tiffany Evenstad, Michael Fletcher, Ruben Gonzalez, Marcia Ingerslev, Julie Keller, Megan Lashley, Huong Nguyen, Chris Paul, Deb Spitzer, Jessica Thomashow, Megan Ware, Peter Weschler


Rationale: The field guide tests are set up as inquiry but students end the unit with an incomplete conceptual understanding of the various minerals. Instead, let’s focus on the creation of a field guide (which naturally relies on the work of other scientists) and build a conceptual understanding of the minerals. Students will get a chance to make claims and arguments throughout the tests rather than just at the end. Finally, students use the field guide they created to identify the new minerals in lesson 15, so the inquiry is still there but with greater meaning and application.